Make Architecture

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03/15 3D PRINTING / SCANNING

3D PRINTING + 3D SCANNING



3D SCANNING


DIGITIZING ARM

SCANNED PROBE

TRIANGULATION

STRUCTURED LIGHT

Structured light is the process of projecting a known pattern of pixels (often grids or horizontal bars) on to a scene. The way that these deform when striking surfaces allows vision systems to calculate the depth and surface information of the objects in the scene, as used in structured light 3D scanners.

TIME OF FLIGHT

Time of flight (TOF) describes a variety of methods that measure the time that it takes for an object, particle or acoustic, electromagnetic or other wave to travel a distance through a medium. This measurement can be used for a time standard (such as an atomic fountain), as a way to measure velocity or path length through a given medium, or as a way to learn about the particle or medium (such as composition or flow rate). The traveling object may be detected directly (e.g., ion detector in mass spectrometry) or indirectly (e.g., light scattered from an object in laser doppler velocimetry).

LIDAR

LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) is an optical remote sensing technology that measures properties of scattered light to find range and/or other information of a distant target.

CONFOCAL

Confocal laser scanning microscopy

TOMOGRAPHY

skyscan

Tomography is imaging by sections or sectioning, through the use of wave of energy.[1] A device used in tomography is called a tomograph, while the image produced is a tomogram. The method is used in radiology, archaeology, biology, geophysics, oceanography, materials science, astrophysics and other sciences. In most cases it is based on the mathematical procedure called tomographic reconstruction. The word was derived from the Greek word tomos which means “a section”, “a slice” or “a cutting”. A tomography of several sections of the body is known as a polytomography.

SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

OPACITY

3D PRINTING

FUSED DEPOSITION MODELLING

MULTIJET MODELLING

INK JET BINDER

SELECTIVE LASER SINTERING

Wikipedia

DIRECT METAL SINTERING

STEREOLITHOGRAPHY

FILE FORMATS

STL

.obj

LINKS

http://fab.cba.mit.edu/classes/MIT/863.09/people/nick/week6/index.html

http://fab.cba.mit.edu/classes/MIT/863.09/people/dcarr/3d/3d.html

http://fab.cba.mit.edu/classes/MIT/863.09/people/sarah/3D/index

GREG LYNN RECYCLED TOY FURNITURE pics


ASSIGNMENT

3D print Something which moves or has operability

Extra Credit for Scanning

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4.184 MAKE ARCHITECTURE

4.184 - ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN WORKSHOP:
[MAKING ARCHITECTURE] THE RESULTS
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Instructor: Nick Gelpi TA: Skylar Tibbits TA: Varvara Toulkeridou
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Class Times, Monday, 1-4pm - room 5-216
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4.184 is an intensive introduction to methods of making explored through a wide range of brief but focused 1-week exercises. We'll engage the real and leave behind representation in the focused context of this class gaining skills for utilizing a range of fabrication machines and technologies from lasercutting, waterjet, 3D printing, welding, formworking-molding, casting, gears, joints and composites.
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In this workshop we'll constrain ourselves to the territory of the 1:1. Students will represent architectural constructions at full scale and develop a more intimate relationship with technology by engaging the tools and techniques that empower us. We will gain access to the most cutting edge machines and technologies in the MARS lab at the Center for Bits and Atoms.
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The second layer of information for this course will be to look at a series of case studies in which construction methods and technologies have played a dominant role in the design process .
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Over the past 20 years, architects have focused on the technology of representation to create new ideas of what architecture could be. Looking back today, much of that research failed to substantially change the way we design buildings by focusing on apriori formal configurations. This class makes the contention that this failure comes from a lack of considerations of the potentials within fabrication knowledge. We look to the future of what building might become, given the expanded palette of personalize-able technologies available to us as architects. Students will participate in curious technological and material investigations, to discover the potentials, known and unknown, for these various technologies.
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The sub-disciplines of what's drawn and what's built have been compartmentalized and disassociated as the representational tools of architecture have distanced themselves from the techniques of making. At the same time the technologies for “making” in architecture have provided us with new possibilities for reinventing how we translate into reality, the immaterial representations of architecture.
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CONTENT, SCHEDULE, PEOPLE

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